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My First Time

March 19, 2020

It is easy to like something or dislike it, but in our modern era, you will either offend someone or start an argument in the comments section while being abused by someone you haven’t met before. On one end of the spectrum, you have a plethora of people who are inspired by Lamborghini as a goal, achievement or memory of something fun and exciting, or those who have pledged allegiance to another brand for the same reason, but one way or another the raging Italian bull has made its way to your timeline in life one way or another.

As a motoring journalist, I drool and perv over cars like this either on the internet or in a showroom, but nothing prepares you for the sheer shock your body and emotions will go through when you are given they keys drive to your heart’s content around beautiful Cape Town on an official launch. I drive many cars, some are fast saloon cars with Nurburgring lap record times, while others remain daily driven super hatchbacks and coupes, but what about a purebred supercar?

When you need to succeed your predecessor which has been one of the most sold supercars in the brand’s history, a lot of weight and pressure is on you. Born in 2014 the Huracan boasted wild and bold looks, typical of the Italian carmaker, the V10 was kept from its predecessor, the Gallardo, but made bigger to 5.2 litres and paired with a modern-day 7-speed dual-clutch, sprinted to 100km/h in 3.2 seconds and made 610 horsepower through all 4 wheels gaining the code name LP 610-4. Jam-packed with 21st-century technology too, this was the entire embodiment of Lamborghinis almost 50-year lifespan of small fast supercars.

The literal keys to my now heightened senses were, the Huracan Evo, a facelift of the Huracan that received some serious upgrades that one could actually say it’s been overhauled. The feisty and sharp looks reminiscent to the persona of a runway model at fashion week had been improved. The chiselled jaw front bumper receives what Lamborghini calls Ypsilon shape intake for better airflow.

While the side of the Evo has distinct hexagon design references in the windows, wheels and side air intakes.

The rear of the Huracan is where you see the biggest changes. The new exhaust has ditched the quad-pipe route and has kept the twin-exhausts from the Performante providing an invigorating soundtrack that can be felt in one’s chest. As a whole, the Evo looks perfect, not too outrageous but styled to combine both the subtlety of its first iteration, while adding elements of the hardcore track version. The perfect facelift in any world.

Getting in the Evo was something of an experience itself, at 5 feet 11 inches tall you would fit snug and be okay, but if you happen to be over 6 feet you might find the cabin to feel a bit intimate, speaking of which, once you are inside the Evo you are greeted by the beautiful and fragrant aromas of suede, leather and very specific button layouts. The cabin is focused on making everything about the driving experience. The top centre console featured the window buttons, hazards, nose lift, and traction control while everything else could be operated on the steering wheel only. Cabin distraction was minimal, something I like because everything else could be found on the touch screen.

As I was given the keys to freedom the reality sunk in that I would power the most powerful V10 Lamborghini to date. Speaking of which, was taken from the Performante. Lamborghini did not update the car via software but rather gave the exact same engine from the hardcore version resulting in the Evo having 470kW at 8,000 rpm with 600 Nm of torque. The car weighs 1,422 kg which meant that after I engage all the hero buttons I would get from 0-100 km/h in 2.9 seconds, 200 km/h in 9.0 seconds and brake from 100 km/h to 0 in just 31.9 m, with a top speed of more than 325 km/h. I took a deep breath, flipped the fighter jet style start button and brought the engine to life.

Cruising around, the Evo felt as easy to drive as your daily commuter. No, it does. Trust me on this one. The car has 3 driving modes to choose from. Setting in default and the first mode was Strada. The gear changes were smooth, the engine was subtle thanks to the active exhaust valves keeping the noise to a minimum hum, and I could drive through the city center without disturbing the peace. Who am I kidding, Strada lasted only 2 minutes where I immediately changed to Sport, the second setting. Now I should point out that while driving the car you can pick up hints that this is a purebred car. You sit very low to the ground, the sensation could be described as being in a go-kart, you feel the stiffness of the car and the subtle bouncing about on the roads, but this was only thanks to the bad conditions of the roads, and as I kept going I could sense the built-up rage behind me each time I came to a stop and the engine downshifted for me with passion.

Now in its element, the exhausts opened up, the gear shifts became sharper and the titanium exhaust spat out wonderful downshift soundtracks accompanied by the below of explosions popping and banging. The road emptied from the city and we headed into the mountain. First corner in, I pressed the accelerator and experienced something I had never felt in my life. It was a rewarding and emotional experience but felt like the longest and visceral experience ever. My right foot squeezed the pedal while I heard the glorious sound of induction, air entering the engine intake while speeding up the sounds of the tappets and valves clicking away so. The sound increased and the V10 became louder and louder as I was thrown back into my seat as I clenched the steering wheel while the rev counter blasted past 8000rpm before shifting. I was in love, I lifted off the accelerator, tried to fathom what had happened and then repeated the process again and again in the mountains building up more confidence with the car as I went on.

This was was fast and far more capable than any YouTube video I had ever watched. It revs and speeds up faster than you can count and the gear shifts are faster than you could think. It was a serious machine and so because I had to remind myself that this was a supercar. I have been fortunate enough to drive many fast performance cars that were pepped up to be quicker, but not like this, not like a machine that was born to do this. Each time I gave the car more, it gave me more back to reward my efforts. The steering was sharp and darted where ever I pointed it to, and the handling superb. I had nobody roll or lack of grip whatsoever, and the brakes were face tearing.

I soon discovered that the Evo was a car that required you to push yourself, your boundaries and your limits. With more confidence, I switched to the last mode, Corsa, where the car was now at its most heightened. No matter how hard I pushed, the car gave me more. More power on the straights, more turn in on the corners, more grip coming out, and more confidence to brake later. For the first time ever I experienced the butterfly feeling of being in a fast car for the first time. As I continued the hunt to live in perfection more into the heart and soul of the Evo, each gear change was met with an explosion of power and pull from the accelerator followed by a loud bang on each downshift while the V10 sang its heart and soul to the heavens.

I continued into the mountains both speechless and in awe that a car like this was on sale today. The top tier of motoring was in a dealership waiting to be bought by some lucky individual. For the next 300km of the road, I continued to use the Evo as it was intended and the car kept giving me back what I wanted as I approached its limit. It didn’t fail or disappoint in any way even if I did want to break it. It was strong, ready to take any abuse thrown at it, yet capable to dispense reward in any way shape or form. Never have I felt so alive and connected to a car before. My senses were both on edge and soaked in endorphins and I could not help but smile all the way home.

As I headed home in the Evo and switched back into Strada I realized that I met my hero. Not only that, but my hero did not disappoint me at all. I had worried a bit at the possibility of that happening but my expectations were blown out the water. We see these cars at shows, dealerships, and always admire these cars from a distance but can’t fathom the who, what when or why behind it. After immersing myself in the car I can understand why someone would buy it. The Huracan Evo needs no convincing, price waiver or criticism and as a journalist, it becomes hard to critique a car that only a few will buy or experience, which is almost unfair to say because we all look for faults and flaws in anything, but I am not here to tell you that. Not today.

The Huracan Evo is unapologetic, outrageous and fun. It was not made to be practical or sensible, but more to be an entertainer and a finale in any show to close off with a bang. Choosing this car comes down to taste, experiences, and emotions. Remember the story of how many others have said, when deciding on a favourite supercar, the Lamborghini will always be the bedroom wall poster that you will always want one day. The others it competes with have a long history too and are as powerful if not more, but that isn’t the goal of this car. It does not want to compete or brag or show off. It wants to grab your attention and speak to your soul and emotions. The looks are sharp, the soundtrack wild and the personality insatiable, and by indulging myself in this product I can say that it has done its job. The car doesn’t need any convincing. If you have decided that a Lamborghini is a car for you, consider the deal already done.

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